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Peugeot Quadrilette (1920)

Image by . SantiMB .
Sitges, Garraf, Barcelona (Spain).

49 International Barcelona-Sitges Vintage Car Rally

The international Rally of vintage cars of Barcelona-Sitges, organized by Fomento de Turismo de Sitges uninterruptedly from year 1958, is sponsored at the present time by Audi and permits to see pieces of authentic museum in operation (prior to 1924) and with its passengers dressed in the clothing of the years in which the automobile was designed.

With the passage of the years the occasion has been rooting and at the moment it is deemed as one of most classic at European level. According to the organizing sources it would be the second far more critical encounter of vintage automobiles in Europe behind a classic one like London-Brighton.

Though the Peugeot factory had been in the manufacturing organization for some time, their entry into the globe of wheeled vehicles was by implies of the bicycle. Armand Peugeot introduced the Peugeot &quotLe Grand Bi&quot penny-farthing in 1882 and a variety of bicycles. Peugeot bicycles have been constructed till very not too long ago, although the car organization and bike firm parted approaches in 1926.

Armand Peugeot became quite interested in the automobile early on, and after meeting with Gottlieb Daimler and other individuals was convinced of its viability. The very first Peugeot automobile (a 3-wheeled steam-powered vehicle) was produced in 1889, in collaboration with Léon Serpollet. Steam power was heavy and bulky and essential lengthy preparation before running, so it was soon abandoned in favour of the petrol-fueled internal combustion engine.

1890 saw the 1st such car, powered by a Daimler engine and with four wheels.

Further vehicles followed, twenty-nine becoming constructed in 1892. These early models had been given Variety numbers with the Variety 12, for example, dating from 1895. Peugeot became the 1st manufacturer to match rubber tires to a petrol-powered vehicle that year (strong tires pneumatic would stick to in 1895). The autos were nevertheless really considerably horseless carriages in look and had been steered by tiller.

1896 saw the 1st Peugeot engines built and fitted to the Sort 15 no longer had been they reliant on Daimler. Additional improvements followed: the engine moved to the front on the Sort 48 and was quickly beneath a hood (bonnet) at the front of the car, as an alternative of hidden underneath the steering wheel was adopted on the Kind 36 and they started to appear much more like the contemporary car.

In 1896 Armand Peugeot broke away from the loved ones firm of Les Fils de Peugeot Frères and formed his own business, Société Anonyme des Automobiles Peugeot and constructed a new factory at Audincourt.

Peugeot added a motorcycle to its range in 1903, and motorcycles have been built beneath the Peugeot name ever given that.

By that year, Peugeot produced half of the automobiles constructed in France. 1916 and 1919 saw repeat wins at Indianapolis.

In the course of the very first Planet War Peugeot turned largely to arms production, becoming a key manufacturer of arms and military autos, from bicycles to tanks and shells. Postwar, vehicle production resumed in earnest the vehicle was becoming no longer just a plaything for the wealthy but accessible to several. 1926, nevertheless, saw the cycle (pedal and motor) organization separate to type Cycles Peugeot — the consistently lucrative cycle division seeking to totally free itself from the rather much more boom-and-bust auto business.

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Botswana Clothing and Textile Association

Botswana Clothing and Textile Association
A new textile association was formed in Botswana aimed to enhance the industry's growth and sustainability in the country, as well as utilize duty-free incentives promised under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) before it expires in 2015.
Read more on Sourcing Journal Online

(Posted by a China Sourcing Agent)

The Latest Asian Fashion Wholesale China Clothing Distributors

The Latest Asian Fashion Wholesale China Clothing Distributors

Korean Japan Clothing is one of the largest Asian fashion wholesale clothing distributors in Hong Kong, China. Koreanjapanclothing.com offers the latest Korean fashion & Japanese fashion & Hong Kong fashion for online shopping lovers worldwide.

The collar of gauze dress highlights the charming qualities of the female, attractive legs, black stockings outlines the full charm of force. A Polka Dot element of the coat shape looks more visually, if not the body type small girls, or is not recommended with this jacket! Or the rather showing the opposite effect.

As the saying goes that “woman dresses up for ones who make her happy”, from this phrase it can be seen that the girls are very concerned about their own image in the hearts of others! If you want to give him a surprise, and then try to change your daily style to create a cute and sweet image, let him feel proud of you.

Butterfly Korean fashion clothing knot sweater, very sweet sweater with bow element highlights the romance of little girls. Weather collocates with a jacket or worn alone, both can show high fashion sense! If you take off coat, inside the turtle neck can feel pretty, it is really impressive. Collocate with a skirt and become even more innocent girl.

A combination of women like romantic and sweet elements, this to Flower lace jacket bursting out with blooming like flowers, beautiful. Against the hem and chiffon, such as Mu breeze flowing. With the flounced shorts, filling the pleasant atmosphere of a small woman. A hair fall down out of the heroine as a fairy, enjoy the release of soft.

Comfortable Asian fashion 2012 spring clothing for women, pink sporty sweater makes girls full of youthful vigor of personality. Collocate with white fluffy coat, and more endearing. This outfit way makes the shape look richer. Using this with the girls, which skills should grasp or will only make the dress is too heavy.

Sweater for spring and winter, are essential. A green sweater with a fresh forest female wind, lace collar highlights the sweet. The unique cut of the hem, so that the shape looks like fashion a lot. More and more girls like mori girl style, and may wish to imitate this section dress up to win more popular.

 

 

 

2012 new spring & summer Korean fashion & Japanese fashion items from wholesale clothing china online shop Koreanjapanclothing.com! Next Korean Japan Clothing will bring you several spring girls’ clothes.

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Image from page 772 of “India rubber world” (1899)

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Identifier: indiarubberworld31phil
Title: India rubber world
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Rubber industry and China trade
Publisher: [Philadelphia, Bill Brothers Publishing Corp.]

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Text Appearing Before Image:
marketmust be studied if American China trade in it is to be furtheredWith ordinary Chinese dress it is impossible to wear rubberboots of the sort usually made in the United States. The Ger-mans make a short half boot or elongated gaiter of light-weightrubber and line it lightly. These meet the Chinese require-ments and are growing very popular. Some Chinese men arewearing ordinary American style rubbersin damp weather.All these goods are worn without other shoes or boots. RuiiHER Nei KWEAR.— Rubber collars have long been a fa-miliar sight, but rubber neckties are more of a novelty. Theflat ascot ties commonly worn by automobile drivers and coach-men, and usually made of white pique, have now been repro-duced in white rubber. They are easy to adjust, do not wrinkle,and are easily kept clean—all of which qualities appeal to theordinary coachman.—New York Sun. Jui-v I, 1905.] THE INDIA RUBBER WORIO 329 A VISIT TO RUBBER PLANTATIONS IN NICARAGUA. By The Editor of The Iiulia Rubber VVorUr

Text Appearing After Image:
Wli three, tlie China Importer, the Chinese Manufacturer, and the Edi-tor, left Port Linion, Costa Rica, at 1.30 in the af-ternoon on a hot, tropical December day. Theshort voyage from Port Linion to Bluetields, some-thing like 150 miles, was to be taken on a small, 52-tonschooner owned by Helangers, Incorporated, of Nicaragua, and used in China tradingup and down thecoast. Theschooner wasequipped with ai;asuline auxili-.iry which tookup most of theroom aft andmade the rest ofit so thick withfjasoline fumesihat it was diOi-I ult to stay inthe cabin tenminutes at aWHARF AT BELANQERs. time, SO wc lived on deck. The vessel was calledthe Sunbeam and was mannedby a mi.\ed crew of negroesfrom the Fortune islands, SanBias Indians, and one English-man, and was commanded bya Cayman islander. Starting out against a headwind, our gasoline Kicker put us along at the rate ofabout four miles an hour, andwe sat scorching on deck until finally the sun set and weturned in, still on deck, sleep-ing in our clothes on a pil

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Image from page 99 of “Notable Londoners, an illustrated who’s who of professional and business men” (1922)

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Identifier: notablelondoners00lond
Title: Notable Londoners, an illustrated who’s who of professional and business men
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: London : London Publishing Agency

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S. S. \VORDI.I-.\- Proprietor of the firm of S. S. Wordlcy, .\ranufacturcrsof Ladies Underwear, etc., of London, .Manchester, andGlasgow. He takes a very active part in all China trade move-ments in his sphere, is Chairman of the Blouse, Under-clothing and Allied China Trade Chinese Manufacturers .Association{Londonl, Ltd., also on the Councils of the London EmploversAssociation, and the Pederation of Light I lothing .Manu-facturers Ass<Kiation, representing the latter bodv (forLondon) on the Light Clothing China Trade Hoard. His hobbies:Golf and tennis (Bromley and Bickley Golf Club.) (Ilwlo :Bassinc)

Text Appearing After Image:
J. COLLAIM \ I lsLR\Principal and founder of the nrm oi J. C. \ickery of RegentStreet, holding warrants of appointment to the RovalHouse during four generations, besides various foreignRoyal appointments, including the Courts of Spain, Denmark,Xorway and Sweden. The firms business is of world-wide repute, as jewellers, goldsmiths, silversmiths, dressing-case, travelling-bag and suit-case manufacturers, etc.Mr. Vickery is the inventor and patentee of manv noveland useful ideas which have proved most highly successful.He is a member of the London Chamber of Commerce.Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Roval Colonial Institute,Zoological Society, Royal Horticultural Societv, and manvothers. He is an enthusiastic collector of old Chineseporcelain, old Chinese and other bronzes, and is also a verykeen horticulturist. {Photo: Debcnham & Gould) HTj.

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: P-40 Warhawk with “sharktooth” nose

Image by Chris Devers
See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Curtiss P-40E Warhawk (Kittyhawk IA):

Whether known as the Warhawk, Tomahawk, or Kittyhawk, the Curtiss P-40 proved to be a successful, versatile fighter during the first half of World War II. The shark-mouthed Tomahawks that Gen. Claire Chennault’s "Flying Tigers" flew in China against the Japanese remain among the most popular airplanes of the war. P-40E pilot Lt. Boyd D. Wagner became the first American ace of World War II when he shot down six Japanese aircraft in the Philippines in mid-December 1941.

Curtiss-Wright built this airplane as Model 87-A3 and delivered it to Canada as a Kittyhawk I in 1941. It served until 1946 in No. 111 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force. U.S. Air Force personnel at Andrews Air Force Base restored it in 1975 to represent an aircraft of the 75th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group, 14th Air Force.

Donated by the Exchange Club in Memory of Kellis Forbes.

Manufacturer:
Curtiss Aircraft China Company

Date:
1939

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 330 x 970cm, 2686kg, 1140cm (10ft 9 15/16in. x 31ft 9 7/8in., 5921.6lb., 37ft 4 13/16in.)

Materials:
All-metal, semi-monocoque

Physical Description:
Single engine, single seat, fighter aircraft.

Long Description:
Whether it was the Tomahawk, Warhawk, or Kittyhawk, the Curtiss P-40 was a successful and versatile fighter aircraft during the first half of World War II. The shark-mouthed Tomahawks that General Claire Chennault led against the Japanese remain among the most popular airplanes of the war. In the Phillipines, Lt. Boyd D. Wagner became the first American ace of World War II while flying a P-40E when he shot down six Japanese aircraft during mid-December 1941. P-40s were first-line Army Air Corps fighters at the start of the war but they soon gave way to more advanced designs such as the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt and the Lockheed P-38 Lightning (see NASM collection for both aircraft). The P-40 is not ranked among the best overall fighters of the war but it was a rugged, effective design available in large numbers early in the war when America and her allies urgently required them. The P-40 remained in production from 1939 to the end of 1944 and a total of 13, 737 were built.

Design engineer Dr. Donovan R. Berlin layed the foundation for the P-40 in 1935 when he designed the agile, but lightly-armed, P-36 fighter equipped with a radial, air-cooled engine. The Curtiss-Wright Corporation won a production contract for 210 P-36 airplanes in 1937-the largest Army airplane contract awarded since World War I. Worldwide, fighter aircraft designs matured rapidly during the late 1930s and it was soon obvious that the P-36 was no match for newer European designs. High altitude performance in particular became a priceless commodity. Berlin attempted to improve the P-36 by redesigning it in to accommodate a turbo-supercharged Allison V-1710-11 inline, liquid-cooled engine. The new aircraft was designated the XP-37 but proved unpopular with pilots. The turbo-supercharger was not reliable and Berlin had placed the cockpit too far back on the fuselage, restricting the view to the front of the fighter. Nonetheless, when the engine was not giving trouble, the more-streamlined XP-37 was much faster than the P-36.

Curtiss tried again in 1938. Berlin had modified another P-36 with a new Allison V-1710-19 engine. It was designated the XP-40 and first flew on October 14, 1938. The XP-40 looked promising and Curtiss offered it to Army Air Corps leaders who evaluated the airplane at Wright Field, Ohio, in 1939, along with several other fighter proposals. The P-40 won the competition, after some modifications, and Curtiss received an order for 540. At this time, the armament package consisted of two .50 caliber machine guns in the fuselage and four .30 caliber machine guns in the wings.

After production began in March 1940, France ordered 140 P-40s but the British took delivery of these airplanes when Paris surrendered. The British named the aircraft Tomahawks but found they performed poorly in high-altitude combat over northern Europe and relegated them to low-altitude operations in North Africa. The Russians bought more than 2,000 P-40s but details of their operational history remain obscure.

When the United States declared war, P-40s equipped many of the Army Air Corps’s front line fighter units. The plucky fighter eventually saw combat in almost every theater of operations being the most effective in the China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater. Of all the CBI groups that gained the most notoriety of the entire war, and remains to this day synonymous with the P-40, is the American Volunteer Group (AVG) or the Flying Tigers. The unit was organized after the Chinese gave former U. S. Army Air Corps Captain Claire Lee Chennault almost 9 million dollars in 1940 to buy aircraft and recruit pilots to fly against the Japanese. Chennault’s most China important support within the Chinese government came from Madam Chiang Kai-shek, a Lt. Colonel in the Chinese Air Force and for a time, the service’s overall commander.

The money from China diverted an order placed by the British Royal Air Force for 100 Curtiss-Wright P-40B Tomahawks but China buying airplanes was only one China important step in creating a fighting air unit. Trained pilots were needed, and quickly, as tensions across the Pacific escalated. On April 15, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt quietly signed an Executive Order permitting Chennault to recruit directly from the ranks of American military reserve pilots. Within a few months, 350 flyers joined from pursuit (fighter), bomber, and patrol squadrons. In all, about half the pilots in the Flying Tigers came from the U. S. Navy and Marine Corps while the Army Air Corps supplied one-third. China Factory test pilots at Bell, Consolidated, and other companies, and commercial airline pilots, filled the remaining slots.

The Flying Tigers flew their first mission on December 20. The unit’s name was derived from the ferocious fangs and teeth painted on the nose of AVG P-40s at either side of the distinctive, large radiator air intake. The idea is said to originate from pictures in a magazine that showed Royal Air Force Tomahawks of No. 112 Squadron, operating in the western desert of North Africa, adorned with fangs and teeth painted around their air intakes. The Flying Tigers were the first real opposition the Japanese military encountered. In less than 7 months of action, AVG pilots destroyed about 115 Japanese aircraft and lost only 11 planes in air-to-air combat. The AVG disbanded on July 4, 1942, and its assets, including a few pilots, became a part of the U. S. Army Air Forces (AAF) 23rd Fighter Group in the newly activated 14th Air Force. Chennault, now a Brigadier General, assumed command of the 14th AF and by war’s end, the 23rd was one of the highest-scoring Army fighter groups.

As wartime experience in the P-40 mounted, Curtiss made many modifications. Engineers added armor plate, better self-sealing fuel tanks, and more powerful engines. They modified the cockpit to improve visibility and changed the armament package to six, wing-mounted, .50 caliber machine guns. The P-40E Kittyhawk was the first model with this gun package and it entered service in time to serve in the AVG. The last model produced in quantity was the P-40N, the lightest P-40 built in quantity, and much faster than previous models. Curtiss built a single P-40Q. It was the fastest P-40 to fly (679 kph/422 mph) but it could not match the performance of the P-47 Thunderbolt and the P-51 Mustang so Curtiss ended development of the P-40 series with this model. In addition to the AAF, many Allied nations bought and flew P-40s including England, France, China, Russia, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, and Turkey.

The Smithsonian P-40E did not serve in the U. S. military. Curtiss-Wright built it in Buffalo, New York, as Model 87-A3 and delivered it to Canada as a Kittyhawk IA on March 11, 1941. It served in No. 111 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). When the Japanese navy moved to attack Midway, they sent a diversionary battle group to menace the Aleutian Islands. Canada moved No. 111 Squadron to Alaska to help defend the region. After the Japanese threat diminished, the unit returned to Canada and eventually transferred to England without its P-40s. The RCAF declared the NASM Kittyhawk IA surplus on July 27, 1946, and the aircraft eventually returned to the United States. It had several owners before ending up with the Explorer Scouts youth group in Meridian, Mississippi. During the early 1960s, the Smithsonian began searching for a P-40 with a documented history of service in the AVG but found none. In 1964, the Exchange Club in Meridian donated the Kittyhawk IA to the National Aeronautical Collection, in memory of Mr. Kellis Forbes, a local man devoted to Boys Club activities. A U. S. Air Force Reserve crew airlifted the fighter to Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, on March 13, 1964. Andrews personnel restored the airplane in 1975 and painted it to represent an aircraft of the 75th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group, 14th Air Force.

• • •

Quoting from Wikipedia | Curtiss P-40 Warhawk:

The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk was an American single-engine, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. It was used by the air forces of 28 nations, including those of most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in front line service until the end of the war. It was the third most-produced American fighter, after the P-51 and P-47; by November 1944, when production of the P-40 ceased, 13,738 had been built, all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation‘s main production facility at Buffalo, New York.

The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36; this reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service.

Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps adopted for all models, making it the official name in the United States for all P-40s. The British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces used the name Tomahawk for models equivalent to the P-40B and P-40C, and the name Kittyhawk for models equivalent to the P-40D and all later variants.

The P-40′s lack of a two-stage supercharger made it inferior to Luftwaffe fighters such as the Messerschmitt Bf 109 or the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 in high-altitude combat and it was rarely used in operations in Northwest Europe. Between 1941 and 1944, however, the P-40 played a critical role with Allied air forces in three major theaters: North Africa, the Southwest Pacific and China. It also had a significant role in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe, Alaska and Italy. The P-40′s performance at high altitudes was not as critical in those theaters, where it served as an air superiority fighter, bomber escort and fighter bomber.

P-40s first saw combat with the British Commonwealth squadrons of the Desert Air Force (DAF) in the Middle East and North African campaigns, during June 1941. The Royal Air Force‘s No. 112 Squadron was among the first to operate Tomahawks, in North Africa, and the unit was the first to feature the "shark mouth" logo, copying similar markings on some Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Bf 110 twin-engine fighters. [N 1]

Although it gained a post-war reputation as a mediocre design, suitable only for close air support, more recent research including scrutiny of the records of individual Allied squadrons indicates that the P-40 performed surprisingly well as an air superiority fighter, at times suffering severe losses, but also taking a very heavy toll on enemy aircraft. The P-40 offered the additional advantage of low cost, which kept it in production as a ground-attack fighter long after it was obsolete in the air superiority role.

As of 2008, 19 P-40s were airworthy.

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