A Miao Festival in Guizhou, China

Some cool china sourcing group images:

A Miao Festival in Guizhou, China

Image by Minneapolis Institute of Arts
The Miao are one of several ethnic minorities living in the
subtropical mountainous areas of southwestern China. Different groups
include the Dong, Yi, Yao, Shui, Buyi (Bouyei), Li, Gejia, and Bai among many
others. For thousands of years, these migrating peoples have developed
rich, cultural traditions and they are increasingly being recognized
for their extraordinary handcrafted textiles and silver jewelry. It is
the area of costume where mythology, technical skill, and cultural
identity coalesce in vivid aesthetic expression. Until recently, most
of these remote, ethnic villages were relatively isolated from the
majority Han Chinese population. China’s rapid modernization, however,
has penetrated even the minority districts of Guizhou, Yunnan,
Guangxi, and Guangdong provinces. The resultant economic, educational,
and social changes have already begun to erode the look and use of
traditional festive costumes worn by the Miao and other ethnic groups.

In the Spring of 2008, staff of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts
documented villages throughout Guizhou, China and the Sisters Meal
Festival in Shidong.

Explore the MIA’s Ethnic Minority Textiles Collection

Photos by Dan Dennehy for the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

This project has been funded with a grant from the The Institute of
Museum and Library Services. The Institute of Museum and Library
Services is the primary source of federal support for the nations
123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The Institute’s mission is to
create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information
and ideas.www.imls.gov/

Copyright: Some rights reserved. Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

A Woman and Child in a Baby Carrier in Guizhou, China

Image by Minneapolis Institute of Arts
The Miao are one of several ethnic minorities living in the
subtropical mountainous areas of southwestern China. Different groups
include the Dong, Yi, Yao, Shui, Buyi (Bouyei), Li, Gejia, and Bai among many
others. For thousands of years, these migrating peoples have developed
rich, cultural traditions and they are increasingly being recognized
for their extraordinary handcrafted textiles and silver jewelry. It is
the area of costume where mythology, technical skill, and cultural
identity coalesce in vivid aesthetic expression. Until recently, most
of these remote, ethnic villages were relatively isolated from the
majority Han Chinese population. China’s rapid modernization, however,
has penetrated even the minority districts of Guizhou, Yunnan,
Guangxi, and Guangdong provinces. The resultant economic, educational,
and social changes have already begun to erode the look and use of
traditional festive costumes worn by the Miao and other ethnic groups.

In the Spring of 2008, staff of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts
documented villages throughout Guizhou, China and the Sisters Meal
Festival in Shidong.

Explore the MIA’s Ethnic Minority Textiles Collection

Photos by Dan Dennehy for the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

This project has been funded with a grant from the The Institute of
Museum and Library Services. The Institute of Museum and Library
Services is the primary source of federal support for the nations
123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The Institute’s mission is to
create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information
and ideas.www.imls.gov/

Copyright: Some rights reserved. Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Terraced landscape in Guizhou, China

Image by Minneapolis Institute of Arts
The Miao are one of several ethnic minorities living in the
subtropical mountainous areas of southwestern China. Different groups
include the Dong, Yi, Yao, Shui, Buyi (Bouyei), Li, Gejia, and Bai among many
others. For thousands of years, these migrating peoples have developed
rich, cultural traditions and they are increasingly being recognized
for their extraordinary handcrafted textiles and silver jewelry. It is
the area of costume where mythology, technical skill, and cultural
identity coalesce in vivid aesthetic expression. Until recently, most
of these remote, ethnic villages were relatively isolated from the
majority Han Chinese population. China’s rapid modernization, however,
has penetrated even the minority districts of Guizhou, Yunnan,
Guangxi, and Guangdong provinces. The resultant economic, educational,
and social changes have already begun to erode the look and use of
traditional festive costumes worn by the Miao and other ethnic groups.

In the Spring of 2008, staff of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts
documented villages throughout Guizhou, China and the Sisters Meal
Festival in Shidong.

Explore the MIA’s Ethnic Minority Textiles Collection

Photos by Dan Dennehy for the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

This project has been funded with a grant from the The Institute of
Museum and Library Services. The Institute of Museum and Library
Services is the primary source of federal support for the nations
123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The Institute’s mission is to
create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information
and ideas.www.imls.gov/

Copyright: Some rights reserved. Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s