NYC – Queens – Flushing: Flushing Meadows-Corona Park – Unisphere

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NYC – Queens – Flushing: Flushing Meadows-Corona Park – Unisphere

Image by wallyg
The Unisphere, a 12-story high, spherical stainless steel representation of the Earth, was built as the theme symbol for the 1964 World’s Fair. The Theme of the World’s Fair was "Peace Through Understanding" and the Unisphere represented the theme of global interdependence. It was dedicated to "Man’s Achievements on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe."

Designed by landscape architect Gilmore D. Clarke, the Unisphere was donated by the United States Steel Corporation and constructed by that company’s American Bridge Division. It’s the world’s largest global structure, rising 140 feet and weighing 700,000 pounds. Some sources say the Unisphere weighs 900,000 pounds, a figure which includes the additional weight of its 200-ton inverted tripod base.

Built on the structural foundation that supported the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair’s Perisphere, Unisphere is centered in a large, circular reflecting pool and is surrounded by a series of water-jet fountains designed to obscure its tripod pedestal. The effect is meant to make Unisphere appear as if it is floating in space.During the fair, dramatic lighting at night gave the effect of sunrise moving over the surface of the globe. Additionally, the capitals of nations were marked by uniquely designed lights that held four bulbs each. When one would burn out, another would rotate in place so that the bulbs would not have to be changed during the two-year run of the Fair. None of these lighting effects are still in operation.

Three large orbit rings of stainless steel encircle Unisphere at various angles. These orbit rings represent the tracks of Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth, and Telstar, the first active communications satellite. America was at the height of the Space Age when Unisphere was constructed, and the rings serve as reminders of America’s early space achievements.

Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, often referred to as Flushing Meadow Park or Flushing Meadows Park, occupies 1,255 acres between the Van Wyck Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway, stretching from Flushing Bay to Union Turnpike. The site, originally known as the Corona Ash Dumps, was cleared by Parks Commissioner Robert Moses in preparation for the 1939-1940 World’s Fair, and later used for the 1964-1965 World’s Fair. Iconic remnants from the two fairs include the New York State Building, the Unisphere, and the New York State Pavilion. The US Open tennis tournament takes place in Flushing Meadows Park at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, and the New York Mets play their home games in Citi Field at the north end of the park. Shea Stadium, the Mets’ previous home, once stood adjacent to Citi Field.

The Unisphere with its surround pool and fountains was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 16, 1995

Queens – Flushing: Flushing Meadows-Corona Park – Unisphere

Image by wallyg
The Unisphere, a 12-story high, spherical stainless steel representation of the Earth, was built as the theme symbol for the 1964 World’s Fair. The Theme of the World’s Fair was "Peace Through Understanding" and the Unisphere represented the theme of global interdependence. It was dedicated to "Man’s Achievements on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe."

Designed by landscape architect Gilmore D. Clarke, the Unisphere was donated by the United States Steel Corporation and constructed by that company’s American Bridge Division. It’s the world’s largest global structure, rising 140 feet and weighing 700,000 pounds. Some sources say the Unisphere weighs 900,000 pounds, a figure which includes the additional weight of its 200-ton inverted tripod base.

Built on the structural foundation that supported the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair’s Perisphere, Unisphere is centered in a large, circular reflecting pool and is surrounded by a series of water-jet fountains designed to obscure its tripod pedestal. The effect is meant to make Unisphere appear as if it is floating in space.During the fair, dramatic lighting at night gave the effect of sunrise moving over the surface of the globe. Additionally, the capitals of nations were marked by uniquely designed lights that held four bulbs each. When one would burn out, another would rotate in place so that the bulbs would not have to be changed during the two-year run of the Fair. None of these lighting effects are still in operation.

Three large orbit rings of stainless steel encircle Unisphere at various angles. These orbit rings represent the tracks of Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth, and Telstar, the first active communications satellite. America was at the height of the Space Age when Unisphere was constructed, and the rings serve as reminders of America’s early space achievements.

Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, often referred to as Flushing Meadow Park or Flushing Meadows Park, occupies 1,255 acres between the Van Wyck Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway, stretching from Flushing Bay to Union Turnpike. The site, originally known as the Corona Ash Dumps, was cleared by Parks Commissioner Robert Moses in preparation for the 1939-1940 World’s Fair, and later used for the 1964-1965 World’s Fair. Iconic remnants from the two fairs include the New York State Building, the Unisphere, and the New York State Pavilion. The US Open tennis tournament takes place in Flushing Meadows Park at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, and the New York Mets play their home games in Citi Field at the north end of the park. Shea Stadium, the Mets’ previous home, once stood adjacent to Citi Field.

The Unisphere with its surround pool and fountains was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 16, 1995

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