Bedrooms for children: Prepare the ground for those precious wonder years

The Fireside Cook Book by James Beard — first edition (1949) …item 2.. The Bais Yaakov Cookbook (February 15, 2012 / 22 Shevat 5772) …item 3.. Melt-in-Your-Mouth Fish (Jul 18th, 2012) …

Image by marsmet542
There is really nothing like fresh caught fish for a perfect meal. “Simple is best when you prepare fresh” is my motto. A little bit of seasoning, herbs, nuts or spices and you’ve got yourself a real meal that’s not only fresh-tasting but oh-so-good for you.

……..***** All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ……..

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This is an actual double-spread, 2-page illustration removed from the vintage first edition of the 1949 cookbook, "The Fireside Cook Book" by James Beard (the book itself had lost its spine and was too damaged to be sold intact). Illustration by Alice and Martin Provensen.
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img code photo……FRESH FISH…

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There are as many good fish in the Sea as ever came out of it.

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…..item 1)…. aish.com …. www.aish.com ….Yom Kippur: The Blessing of Failure …. Recognizing our shortcomings is the only way to achieve success in life.

by Rabbi Benjamin Blech
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img code photo…..Yom Kippur: The Blessing of Failure

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October 4, 2011 / 6 Tishrei 5772

www.aish.com/h/hh/yk/theme/Yom_Kippur_The_Blessing_Of_Fai…

“What if the Secret to Success Is Failure?”

That was the tantalizing title of the lead story in the New York Times Sunday magazine a few weeks ago. The article makes us rethink an attitude that has become culturally accepted as unquestioned truth, and more profoundly, its conclusions encourage us to acknowledge the wisdom of Jewish tradition and the insights it asks us to emphasize in our observance of Yom Kippur.

Yom Kippur is a day dedicated to acknowledging our failings.

Related Video: Yom Kippur: Everyone Falls
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weblink….Yom Kippur: Everyone Falls

It’s getting up afterwards that matters.
by Charlie Harary

www.aish.com/h/hh/yk/stories/101461854.html

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Over and over again we repeat the words, "I have sinned." We recognize that in many ways we "missed the mark," the literal translation of the Hebrew word for sin. We admit we weren’t perfect. If we were to be graded by God for our actions during the past year, we confess that in some areas we deserve an F.

And yet whoever heard of a mark like that in our contemporary culture?

For decades now parents have been told by many ostensible experts that all they are permitted to do in rearing children is to praise them. Criticism is always destructive of self-esteem, and self-esteem is the highest value we must pass on to our progeny. Make them feel good about themselves; that way they will feel happy and self contented. Don’t ever burden them with the verdict that they have failed to fulfill any objective. Don’t ever crush their spirits by telling them they could’ve done better. Rewards, not criticism or punishments, are what children need to become responsible adults.

The teaching profession, too, was slowly drawn into this philosophy of "praise at all costs" without any reminders of failure. Grade inflation turned everyone into a scholar, because "he tried his best and he might feel bad if he didn’t get an excellent mark." Valedictorians were eliminated in many schools because those who didn’t earn the honor felt the loss of self-esteem, and it just didn’t seem right to acknowledge that some weren’t as perfect as others. More liberal schools eliminated competitive sports – or if they had them, rejected keeping score – so that nobody would ever have to admit to being a loser.

We need to acknowledge our weaknesses and failings if we are ever to improve and become what we are capable of becoming.

But what if the real secret to success is failure?

What if we need to keep score in our own lives and to acknowledge our errors, our weaknesses, and our failings if we are ever to improve and become what we are capable of becoming?

The New York Times article is an eye-opener because it forces us to confront what previous generations knew and we chose to forget: Recognizing our shortcomings is the only way to achieve success in life.

Paul Tough, the author of the essay (the appropriateness of his last name is stunningly obvious), concludes his lengthy analysis with this observation:
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Most Riverdale students can see before them a clear path to a certain type of success. They’ll go to college, they’ll graduate, they’ll get well-paying jobs — and if they fall along the way, their families will almost certainly catch them, often well into their 20s or even 30s, if necessary. But despite their many advantages, Randolph [the headmaster of this exclusive and very wealthy school] isn’t yet convinced that the education they currently receive at Riverdale, or the support they receive at home, will provide them with the skills to negotiate the path toward the deeper success that Seligman and Peterson hold up as the ultimate product of good character: a happy, meaningful, productive life. Randolph wants his students to succeed, of course — it’s just that he believes that in order to do so, they first need to learn how to fail.
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To learn how to fail is nothing less than a succinct five word summary of the Yom Kippur confessional. It requires us to be mature enough to face up to the personal failings which well-meaning parents, teachers and friends tried to shield us from recognizing. It asks us to admit we’re not perfect precisely because we’re willing to take on the challenge of perfecting ourselves.

On Yom Kippur we have to define ourselves in light of a concept that Benjamin Barber, a political scientist at Rutgers University, believes is an ultimate truth about human behavior. We love to categorize people, usually by labeling them by one of two distinctly different characteristics. People are skinny or fat, introverted or extroverted, optimists or pessimists, serious or funny. All of these lead to stereotyping and to generalizations that aren’t completely accurate. But there is one division of people that Barber claims is the most crucial and correct way to differentiate between them. He says:
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I don’t divide the world into the weak and the strong, or the successes and the failures, those who make it or those who don’t. I divide the world into learners and non-learners – those who acknowledge their failures, learn from them, and move forward as opposed to those who can’t admit ever having done anything wrong, never learn from their mistakes, and doom themselves to reliving the errors of their ways.
That’s why on Yom Kippur, when we’re asked to reflect upon whether our lives can be considered a success, we’re judged by whether we’re courageous enough to confess our sins and to admit our failures.
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To acknowledge, to God and to ourselves, where we’ve gone wrong in our lives doesn’t diminish us. On the contrary, it affords us the wisdom and strength to grow and to improve.

S. I. Hayakawa, former U.S. senator from California and a specialist in semantics, alerted us to an all-important distinction between two English words that most of us assume are identical: “Notice the difference between what happens when a man says to himself, `I have failed three times,’ and what happens when he says, `I am a failure.’” To think of yourself as a failure is to create a perpetual self-image as a loser. But if you learn from your experience, if your failure inspires you to surpass yourself and to do it better next time, if you understand that failure is merely a momentary event but doesn’t define you—then you are an alumnus of the best school in the world, and your failure was the tuition you paid for your eventual success.

On Yom Kippur we evaluate ourselves. On Yom Kippur we are critical of our failings. On Yom Kippur we don’t deny our sins – we build on their memory for spiritual growth.

On Yom Kippur we realize the truth that failure – acknowledging it, learning from it, and rising from it – is really the secret of success.
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About the Author
Rabbi Benjamin Blech

Rabbi Benjamin Blech is the author of 12 highly acclaimed books, including Understanding Judaism: The basics of Deed and Creed. He is a professor of Talmud at Yeshiva University and the Rabbi Emeritus of Young Israel of Oceanside which he served for 37 years and from which he retired to pursue his interests in writing and lecturing around the globe. He is also the author of "If God is Good, Why is the World So Bad?" and of the international best-seller, The Sistine Secrets
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…..item 2)…. aish.com … www.aish.com/f/r/ …. The Bais Yaakov Cookbook … Choice recipe from the brand new cookbook.
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img code photo … The Bais Yaakov Cookbook

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by Batsheva Weinstein
February 15, 2012 / 22 Shevat 5772

www.aish.com/f/r/The_Bais_Yaakov_Cookbook.html

Choice recipes from The Bais Yaakov Cookbook.
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—–ROASTED GARLIC ZUCCHINI SOUP

For garlic lovers everywhere! Prepare an extra head of roasted garlic. Its soft caramelized cloves are simply irresistible spread on bread as an accompaniment to this soup. Better yet, pop whole roasted cloves straight into the bowls before filling with soup
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img code photo … ROASTED GARLIC ZUCCHINI SOUP

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1 head of garlic
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for drizzling
5 leeks, sliced in half lengthwise,
cleaned from any dirt, and sliced thinly
4-5 large white onions, diced large
6 zucchini, peeled and diced large
2 quarts (8 cups) water
1/4 cup chicken soup mix
1/4 cup vegetable soup mix
1-2 tablespoons kosher salt (optional in place of soup mix)

Preheat oven to 350°F. Slice off the top of the head of garlic, just enough that the actual cloves are peeking out. Place the bulb on a piece of aluminum foil. Drizzle olive oil over the garlic and seal the foil.

Place sealed garlic in baking pan, to avoid leaking, and roast for 1 hour.

While garlic is roasting, place 2 tablespoons olive oil in a 6-quart pot over medium heat. Add leeks and onions; saute until golden brown. Browning longer will create a deeper flavor. Add zucchini to the pot. Add water, chicken soup mix and vegetable soup mix, or salt. Bring to a boil and cover.

Reduce heat, and simmer on low for 45 minutes. Remove the garlic from the oven and allow to cool. Pop out cloves directly into soup. Transfer soup to a blender and puree until smooth or use an immersion blender directly into the pot. Serve hot.

If there are leftovers, when reheating the soup, heat on low flame, just until warm.
6 servings
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—–GREEN BEAN MANGO SALAD

This unusual salad is a favorite. Your friends and family will be clamoring to add this recipe to their collections.
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img code photo … GREEN BEAN MANGO SALAD

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2 pounds green beans, washed and trimmed
Dressing:
1 cup Italian dressing
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard
Salad:
1 avocado, diced
4 scallions, chopped
1 mango, peeled and diced
1/4 cup sunflower seeds
½ cup chopped pecans
3 cloves garlic, minced
To assemble salad:

Place green beans into a 4-quart pot. Add water to cover. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook 6 minutes or until green beans are bright green. Immediately, remove from heat and drain to stop cooking process.

Whisk Italian dressing, honey and Dijon-style mustard in a small bowl. Place green beans, avocado, scallions and mango into a large salad bowl. Top with sunflower seeds, pecans and minced garlic. Pour dressing over vegetables. Toss to coat.
6 -8 Servings
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—–BEER STEW

Light beer is beer that is reduced in alcohol content or in calories, in comparison to regular beer. The spelling “lite beer” is also commonly used.
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img code photo … BEER STEW

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1 pound beef cubes
1/4 cup flour
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 large onion, sliced
2 garlic cloves, minced
2-4 tablespoons wine vinegar
2 tablespoons fresh parsley leaves, chopped
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon dried basil
1 cup beef broth (1 teaspoon beef soup mix
combined with 1 cup water)
3/4 cup light beer
Prepared rice (optional)

Preheat oven to 325°F. Place flour in a small bowl. Set aside. Heat vegetable oil in a large, preferably ovenproof, skillet over medium flame. While heating, dredge meat in flour. Add onion and garlic to skillet.

Then add meat to skillet. Increase heat to medium high and brown meat for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add wine vinegar, parsley, brown sugar, bay leaf, thyme and basil. Mix well to combine. Pour in broth, followed by beer. Mix well. Transfer stew to a 13x9x2-inch baking dish, or just leave it in the skillet and place in oven.

Bake covered 2½ hours. Serve over bed of rice.
4 servings
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—–BOSTON CREAM PIE

Vanilla Cake:
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img code photo … BOSTON CREAM PIE

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3 large eggs, separated
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup sugar, divided
Pinch salt
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
Custard Filling:
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups milk or non-dairy coffee creamer
6 large egg yolks
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Pinch salt
Chocolate Glaze:
1/2 cup sugar
3 tablespoons corn syrup
2 tablespoons water
4 ounces semi-sweet chocolate, chopped

For the cake:

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 9-inch round cake dish and place a parchment paper round on the bottom. In an electric mixer, beat egg yolks and vanilla on medium speed until well blended. Add cup sugar; beat until well blended, light yellow and thick. Transfer to a bowl. Set aside.
In a clean, dry mixing bowl, beat egg whites and salt on medium speed until soft peaks form. Add remaining . cup sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Fold egg yolk mixture into egg whites and mix gently with a spatula. Sift all-purpose flour over mixture; continue folding gently with a spatula. Pour batter into the prepared baking dish. Bake 25 minutes. When cooled, loosen cake and invert onto wire rack. Remove parchment.

For the filling:

Mix sugar and all-purpose flour in a small saucepan. Whisk in milk or creamer. Add egg yolks, vanilla and salt. Bring to a boil over medium heat, whisking continuously until thick. Remove from heat. Transfer to a medium bowl, press plastic wrap onto the surface of the custard and refrigerate 30 minutes.

To assemble pie:

Using a serrated knife, cut cake in half, horizontally. Spread one half of the cake evenly with filling; it will drip down sides of cake. Top with remaining cake half. Refrigerate while preparing glaze.
In a saucepan, bring sugar, corn syrup and water to a boil over low heat. Cook until sugar dissolves.

Remove from heat. Add chocolate pieces; let stand 1 minute. Whisk until smooth. Gradually pour glaze over cake. Allow glaze to drip down sides of cake. Refrigerate to set.
8 servings

Excerpted from The Bais Yaakov Cookbook. Much more than a cookbook, this is a comprehensive guide to everything connected to food and the kitchen. It is packed with attractive color photographs offering 200 original recipes and a ton of useful information for the cook ranging from shopping to setting an attractive table.
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…..item 3)…. ORTHODOX UNION … www.ou.org/life/food … Enhancing Jewish Life …

Melt-in-Your-Mouth Fish
By Eileen Goltz | Jul 18th, 2012 |

www.ou.org/life/food/recipes/melt-mouth-fish-trout-nine-d…

Please note: Eileen Goltz is a freelance kosher food writer. The Orthodox Union makes no endorsements or representations regarding kashrut certification of various products/vendors referred to in her articles, blog or web site.

There is really nothing like fresh caught fish for a perfect meal. “Simple is best when you prepare fresh” is my motto. A little bit of seasoning, herbs, nuts or spices and you’ve got yourself a real meal that’s not only fresh-tasting but oh-so-good for you.

Trout is a great choice if you’re just getting started cooking fresh fish. You can cook it whole, with the skin on, or filet it. While the movies may show gruff and hearty outdoorsy kind of folks chopping heads off and filleting with a flick of a knife, it’s a tad more involved. (This process can, of course, be used for filleting most any kind of fish.)

Filleting Fish

First wash the fish off and place it on a clean surface. Your knives need to be clean and SHARP. Cut off the head just below the gills and then slit open the belly and remove the guts (yes, this is icky, just do it). As this is a messy job, make sure you have plenty of water to rinse the trout. You can cook the fish at this point or you can butterfly it.

To butterfly the trout, flip your trout upside down so the belly is facing up. Starting on one side of the fish, cut where the head used to be and slide the knife as close as you can get to the backbone and cut along the rib cage. Repeat the process on the other side, as close to the ribs as possible. Now it’s time to take out the backbone. Using your knife and starting at the head end cut underneath the backbone towards the tail, lifting the spine as you cut. Try not to cut through the skin. You have a butterflied trout but there are still more bones. You will see them on each side. You can remove the bones out by cutting as close to them as possible trying not to cut the skin.

If you can’t get the fresh stuff, you can use the fresh frozen or fresh-ish stuff from your grocery or specialty store. The following trout recipes can be used with other fish but, like I said, catch whatever kind you like best for the freshest bestest flavor.
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—–PECAN PAN-FRIED TROUT WITH BROWNED BUTTER (fish and dairy)

Servings: 4 trout fillets

Ingredients:

1 /4 cup oil

1 cup pecans, finely chopped

1 cup fresh challah or panko breadcrumbs

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley*

salt and ground black pepper

4 (6- to 8-ounce) skin-on trout fillets

lemon wedges, for garnish

Pecan Brown Butter

1/4 cup unsalted butter

1 lemon

1/4 cup chopped pecans

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

salt and pepper

Directions

Preheat the oven to 200. Brush a rimmed baking sheet with oil and place in the oven to warm.

In a bowl combine the pecans, breadcrumbs, and parsley and season with salt and pepper. Press the flesh side of each fillet into the pecan mixture. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Place 2 trout in the pan, crust side down, and cook until golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Turn and cook until fish is opaque in the center and just cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes.

Transfer the trout to the prepared baking sheet, crust side up. Place the baking sheet in the oven. Repeat the process with the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and the remaining
2 trout fillets. Transfer to warmed serving plates and serve immediately, garnished with the lemon.

Pecan Brown Butter

Wipe the skillet clean. Add 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter and melt over medium heat. Allow the butter to foam and turn medium brown, swirling in the pan occasionally. Remove the pan from the heat, add the finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon, 1/4 cup chopped pecans, and 1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley; season with coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place the trout, crust side up, on warmed serving plates. Drizzle with the pecan butter. Serve immediately.

Modified from epicurious.com.
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—–EMERIL LAGASSE TROUT IN A POUCH WITH HERBS AND GARLIC (fish)

I absolutely love this fresh herb (and you must use fresh for the best flavor) and fish recipe. The flavors meld and the garlic add a subtle delightful note to the dish.
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img code photo … EMERIL LAGASSE TROUT IN A POUCH WITH HERBS AND GARLIC (fish)

www.ou.org/life/files/iStock_000015504057XSmall-300×199.jpg

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Ingredients:

6 small whole trout, about 1 pound each, cleaned and scaled

6 pieces aluminum foil, about 16 by 16-inches

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

salt and freshly ground black pepper

3 lemons, sliced crosswise

12 cloves garlic, thinly sliced, divided

12 sprigs fresh rosemary, divided

12 sprigs fresh Italian parsley, divided

12 sprigs fresh mint, divided

12 sprigs fresh marjoram or oregano, divided

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons dry white wine, divided

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 375. Rinse fish well inside and out and pat dry with paper towels. Place 1 fish in the center of each square of aluminum foil. Rub each fish with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil on both sides, then season the fish both inside and out with salt and pepper. Stuff the cavities of each fish with lemon slices, 2 cloves of the sliced garlic, and 2 sprigs each of the rosemary, parsley, mint, and marjoram.

Fold all of the edges of the foil upwards to create a bowl-shape, and then drizzle each fish with 2 tablespoons of the remaining olive oil and 3 tablespoons each of the white wine. Fold the top and side edges together tightly so that the fish is completely enclosed in an airtight package. (Fold the edges downward so that the fish is tightly contained.)

Place the pouches on a large baking sheet and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the fish is just cooked through and flakes easily when pierced with a fork.

Serve the fish immediately in shallow rimmed dinner plates or large shallow bowls, with the collected juices drizzled over the fish.

Modified from Emeril Lagasse, 2007 Food Network.
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—–BOURBON GRILLED TROUT AND PORTABELLAS (fish)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

2 to 3 large skinned trout fillets, cut into large pieces

2 to 3 portabella mushrooms, sliced

1/3 cup soy sauce

1/3 cup bourbon

1 cup water

1/3 cup brown sugar

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

1 tablespoon lemon juice

wild rice for 4, made according to the package

Directions:

In a glass bowl combine all of the ingredients. Mix to coat then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour but not more than 3. Lightly grease a grill pan and heat over medium heat. Remove the trout and mushroom pieces from the marinade (discard the marinade) and grill for about 4 to 5 minutes per side (you may need less time for the mushrooms as you just want them to start to cook, not wilt too much) . Serve immediately over the rice.

My files, source unknown.
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—–TROUT MARSALA (fish and dairy)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

2 lbs of trout, skinned and cut into pieces

1 large onion, diced

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 pound sliced baby portabellas

1 1/2 cups Marsala Wine

1 stick butter or margarine

1 cup flour

cooked Rice or noodles

Directions:

Heat the butter or margarine in a large skillet. Add the onion, garlic and mushrooms and saute till tender. Dredge the trout in the flour and add the pieces to the vegetables that are cooking in the skillet. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring and flipping the trout pieces at least once.

Gently pour 1 cup of the wine around the edges of the pan. Mix gently. Cook, uncovered for 4 to 5 minutes.

Remove the trout to the serving platter and then add the remaining wine to the pan and cook, stirring vigorously to get all the little bits off the bottom of the pan. Pour the sauce over the fish and serve with rice or noodles.

My files, source unknown.
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—–GRILLED SESAME PINEAPPLE TROUT (fish)

Servings: 4 – 6

Ingredients:

2 pounds of trout fillets, each filet cut in half

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice

3 tablespoons sesame oil

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 fresh pineapple, peeled, cored, quartered and cut into slices/wedges

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

4 green onions, sliced thin

2 to 3 tablespoons toasted pine nuts (more if you like)

Directions:

In a large glass bowl combine the lime juice, sesame oil, brown sugar, ginger, and soy sauce. Mix to combine and add the trout and pineapple pieces. Mix to coat and cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Heat your grill pan or grill. Remove trout pieces and pineapple pieces from the marinade and discard the marinade. If you’re using a grill, make a foil pan by using 2 pieces of aluminum foil, folding up the edges on all sides. Grease it with cooking spray. Place trout fillets in the aluminum pan and then place that on the hot grill. Cook covered for 6 to 7 minutes.

If using a grill pan, grease it with a little oil and then cook the trout covered. After the trout has been cooking for 6 to 7, minutes add the pineapple to the grill or pan. Cook covered on the grill pan if using the grill pan. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes then flip the fish and the pineapple. Cook for another 4 to 5 minutes, then remove the pineapple from the grill and place it on the serving platter. Cook the fish another minute or two until it’s done. Arrange the fish and pineapple on the serving platter and garnish with sesame seeds, green onions and pine nuts.

Modified from about.com.
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—–MOCK CRAB STUFFED TROUT (fish)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

4 whole trout (about 6 ounces each), cleaned and boned

1 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon soy sauce, divided

5 to 6 ounces imitation crabmeat, shredded

1/2 to 1 cup fresh bread crumbs

1/2 to 2/3 cup shredded carrot

1/4 to 1/3 cup thinly sliced celery

1/4 to 1/3 cup thinly sliced green onions

1 can water chestnuts, drained and diced

1 egg, beaten

2 tablespoons white wine

1 tablespoon grated lemon peel

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

olive oil or sesame oil for brushing

Lemon slices (optional)

Chopped fresh parsley (optional)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375. Line a lipped baking pan with foil and spray it with a non stick spray. Place them on the prepared pan and set them aside. Brush insides of the fish with the 1 teaspoon of soy sauce. In a bowl combine the remaining soy sauce, crabmeat, bread crumbs, carrot, celery, onions, egg, wine, lemon peel, garlic powder and pepper. Mix to combine. Divide the stuffing between the trout, stuffing each fish pretty full. Brush the top of each fish lightly with the oil and bake, uncovered for 30 minutes or done and the fish is firm to the touch. Garnish with lemon slices and chopped parsley.

Submitted by Sharon Bussle of Milwaukee, WI.

*Certain produce requires careful examination for insects. For more information, please visit OU Fruit and Vegetable China Inspection Chart and check out the newly released OU Manual for Checking Fruits and Vegetables.

Eileen Goltz is a freelance kosher food writer who was born and raised in the Chicago area. She graduated from Indiana University and the Cordon Bleu Cooking School in Paris. She lectures on various food-related topics across the U.S. and Canada and writes weekly columns for the Chicago Jewish News, kosher.com and the OU Shabbat Shalom Website. She is the author of the Perfectly Pareve Cookbook (Feldheim) and is a contributing writer for the Chicken Soup for the Soul Book Group, Chicago Sun Times, Detroit Free Press and Woman’s World Magazine. You can visit Eileen’s blog by clicking: Cuisine by Eileen.
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